WCAG 2.0 – Closed Caption, Describe Video and Transcripts

Adding (or burning) captions into raw videos will not satisfy WCAG 2.0 criteria because the text then becomes part of the image which will not be narrated by screen readers or displayed on braille device. Real Closed Caption (CC) / Describe video is actually text overlaying the video for those who are visually impaired. Moodle does not currently offer a way to include subtitles for a video. The standard compliant and best practice approach to inserting video captions requires using the HTML5 <track> element. The various attributes of the is element allow you to specify the type of content, the language … Continue reading

Camtasia alternatives and other media tools for screencasting

Camtasia is one of the best and most complete set of tools out there for capturing a recording of your screen (called screencasting) but comes at a cost of $313.99 per person (as of this writing). While you might be able to afford it for a few licenses, if you want to give access to this tool to your whole staff, the cost can really add up. Here are some recommendations for (mostly) free media related tools — for those on a limited budget: Greenshot — Simple to use, comes with an editor to annotate still screenshot (no video). Kind of like … Continue reading

Making Print Screen Screenshots in Windows

You can capture a screenshot of almost anything that appears on your computer by using any of the following methods in Windows: There is a great free tool called Greenshot that works with the Print Screen button. It allows you to capture any part of the screen you want. Greenshot includes extra features like: Sending your screenshot to the clipboard, a printer, your email application, Powerpoint, Word, Excel and upload directly to Confluence or Dropbox. Opening the image in the Greenshot image editor where you can annotate the image with arrows, shapes, lines and text as well as apply any of several special effects. Includes many advanced … Continue reading

Video and Audio Formats for the Web

Publishing audio or video media on the web? When creating audio or video for publication on the web, here are some guidelines to ensure that yours can be heard and viewed on all computers, tablets  and smartphones. The only assumption is that your target audience isn’t still on dial-up. Audio for Web File Format: MP3 Standard Quality (for speech): 22 kHz, 64 Kbps/mono High Quality (for music): 44.1 kHz, 128 Kbps/stereo Super High Quality (for full range of music): 44.1 kHz, 192 Kbps/stereo Offline Source Files: Should be saved in WAV format, 44.1 kHz, 16-bit, stereo (also known as CD quality) — or … Continue reading